Parents frustrated by Good Shepherd school closure

The Diocese of Monterey has closed Good Shepherd Catholic School in Santa Cruz Superintendent says it’s because of funding and enrollment issues, but parents disagree and say they lost confidence in their diocese.On Thursday, Bishop Daniel Garcia announced the fate of the school issuing this statement “I know some will want to appeal this decision or ask me to keep the school open for another year, but unfortunately this decision is final,” the statement read. Parents say they were told the school would stay open if they met the Diocese of Monterey’s enrollment goal of 90 students by June 30, but the district said they had no never met the criteria. in a half so we get closer so we have an endowment,” said Ayla Smith, chair of the Good Shepherd Catholic School Parents Club Steering Committee. “We were leaving with what was at hand and even with the donations that have been received and pledges that have been received, it has not reached the $20,000 level. We have an endowment, but it’s a permanently restricted endowment where we can’t use the principle,” said Kimberly Chang, school superintendent for the Diocese of Monterey. At its peak, Good Shepherd had over 200 students. But when the school closed for summer vacation on May 27, no one expected it to be the end of nearly six decades of education. “As parents they didn’t do us justice, but as children they didn’t do them justice either. They couldn’t say goodbye to their friends,” mum Amber said Artiaga The diocese offers $500 scholarships to Good Shepherd students who enroll in one of the other Catholic schools in the community, but some parents say their faith in the diocese because they offered false hopes of keeping the school open. said. The superintendent plans to meet individually with each of the 20 staff and teachers in the coming weeks to support their transition. , this is my second family,” the school principal said. Kindergarten Kristen Barkman rumors that the reason the school closed was so the diocese could sell the property, but the superintendent said they had made no plans for the property or the land.

The Diocese of Monterey has closed the Good Shepherd Catholic School in Santa Cruz.

The superintendent says this is due to funding and enrollment issues, but parents disagree and say they have lost faith in their diocese.

On Thursday, Bishop Daniel Garcia announced the fate of the school by issuing this statement

“I know some will want to appeal this decision or ask me to keep the school open for another year, but unfortunately this decision is final,” the statement read.

Parents say they were told the school would stay open if they met the Diocese of Monterey’s enrollment goal of 90 students by June 30, but the district said they had no never met the criteria.

“We were able to raise $20,000 in just a few days, so every other day we’re getting closer so we have an endowment,” said Ayla Smith, chair of the Seven Steering Committee of the Good Shepherd Catholic School Parent Club.

“We were going with what was at hand and even with the donations that were received and the pledges that were received, it didn’t reach the level of $20,000. We have an endowment but it’s a permanently restricted staffing where we cannot use the principle,” said Kimberly Chang, superintendent of the Monterey Diocese school.

At its peak, Good Shepherd had over 200 students. But when the school closed for summer vacation on May 27, no one expected it to be the end of nearly six decades of education.

“As parents they didn’t do us justice, but as children they didn’t do them justice either. They couldn’t say goodbye to their friends,” mother Amber said Artiaga.

The diocese is offering $500 scholarships to Good Shepherd students who enroll in one of the other Catholic schools in the community, but some parents say they’ve lost faith in the diocese because they offered fake hopes of keeping the school open.

“If I do another Catholic school, it will not be a Catholic school run by the [Diocese of Monterey County] because in my opinion. I can’t trust the diocese,” Smith said.

The superintendent plans to meet individually with each of the 20 staff and teachers in the coming weeks to support their transition.

“But it’s hard to start over and it’s hard to leave a place where your heart is, like I said, it’s my second family,” preschool principal Kristen Barkman said.

There are rumors that the reason the school closed was so the diocese could sell the property, but the superintendent said they had made no plans for the property or for the land.

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